Massed pipe and drums bands of the Indian military

7 years ago

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A proud moment for any Indian! The massed bands of the Indian armed forces – army, navy and air force, performing an old British ritual in front of the Rajpath or Vijay Chowk.

Beating of the Tetreat. In India it officially denotes the end of Republic Day festivities. It is conducted on the evening of January 29, the third day after the Republic Day. It is performed by the bands of the three wings of the military, the Indian Army, Indian Navy and Indian Air Force. The venue is Raisina Hill and an adjacent square – Vijay Chowk, flanked by the north and south block of the Rashtrapati Bhavan (President’s Palace) towards the end of Rajpath.

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The Chief Guest of the function is the President of India who arrives escorted by the President’s Bodyguards (PBG), a cavalry unit. When the President begins to arrive, a Fanfare is sounded by the trumpeters of the Brigade of the Guards on their natural trumpets, and then the PBG commander asks the unit to give the National Salute, which is followed by the playing of the Indian National Anthem, Jana Gana Mana, by the Massed Bands, and at the same time by the unfurling of the Flag of India on the flagpole right at the Vijay Chowk.

The ceremony was started in the early 1950s when Major Roberts of the Indian Army developed the ceremony of display by the massed bands in which Military Bands, Pipes and Drums Bands, Buglers and Trumpeters from various Army Regiments besides bands Navy and Air Force take part.

See the twirling of drum sticks in the air, the bagpipes of the Gurkhas, and much more, in this pageantry of the defence forces…

Beating of the retreat. In India it officially denotes the end of Republic Day festivities. It is conducted on the evening of January 29, the third day after the Republic Day. It is performed by the bands of the three wings of the military, the Indian Army, Indian Navy and Indian Air Force. The venue is Raisina Hills and an adjacent square, Vijay Chowk, flanked by the north and south block of the Rashtrapati Bhavan (President’s Palace) towards the end of Rajpath.

The Chief Guest of the function is the President of India who arrives escorted by the President’s Bodyguards (PBG), a cavalry unit. When the President begins to arrive, a Fanfare is sounded by the trumpeters of the Brigade of the Guards on their natural trumpets, and then the PBG commander asks the unit to give the National Salute, which is followed by the playing of the Indian National Anthem, Jana Gana Mana, by the Massed Bands, and at the same time by the unfurling of the Flag of India on the flagpole right at the Vijay Chowk.

The ceremony was started in the early 1950s when Major Roberts of the Indian Army developed the ceremony of display by the massed bands in which Military Bands, Pipes and Drums Bands, Buglers and Trumpeters from various Army Regiments besides bands Navy and Air Force take part.

This footage is part of the professionally-shot stock footage archive of Wilderness Films India Ltd., the largest collection of imagery from South Asia. The Wilderness Films India collection comprises of thousands of hours of high quality broadcast imagery, mostly shot on HDCAM 1080i High Definition, HDV and Digital Betacam. Write to us for licensing this footage on a broadcast format, for use in your production! We pride ourselves in bringing the best of India and South Asia to the world… wfi @ vsnl.com and admin@wildfilmsindia.com.

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26 thoughts on “Massed pipe and drums bands of the Indian military”

  1. Well, that's really a matter of perspective, but those are individuals that have trained long and hard for something that they believe in – a far greater purpose than merely posting critical comments on the internet

  2. India will celebrate the 60th anniversary of its independence next year. One would think they have retained the elements they have chosen to retain from their British legacy and discarded the others. As an American, I am confident we did that well before 1841 (60 years after our independence). As a Wallace and Indian admirer, this is stirring. Thanks for posting.

  3. Not the massed bands…but the massed PIPE and DRUMS band..and very good they are too. Very proud of their long association to the Scottish regiments of old that served in India, I suspect.

  4. Interesting that the Indian armed forces opted to retain some semblance of British traditions. Pipes and drums might be the best of the lot. That and the English language. 😉

  5. I am searching for a slow song played by the army band in some official ceremony(probably antim vidai), i can't find, if you know a couple famous army songs played on piper please suggest me, will be very grateful of you.

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